Helpful Gout Links

This topic contains 12 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Keith Taylor 5 months, 3 weeks ago.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #3306

    d q
    Participant
    Ŧallars: Ŧ 216.33
    GoutPal Scholar Badge Rank: Scholar


    Just wanted to contribute a few helpful albeit technical links to the forum. I know they aren’t really for the question and answer approach but it will help those who wish to dive deeper and understand further into the gout subject. Please feel free to add to the list if you find it will help the developmental and study community.

    Gout management:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3539261/#!po=11.2500

    Rapid crystal dissolution:
    http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/838177

    Real life talks and experiences:
    http://www.healthtalk.org/peoples-experiences/bones-joints/gout/long-term-treatment-lower-uric-acid-and-prevent-gout-attacks-and-long-term-problems

    This link helps provides knowledge for starters and intermediates in understanding gout and a good foundation for learning gout and treatment methods including what can be done to control pain from a good source. Drug dosing is based on UK guidelines but still points gout sufferers in the right direction. I think it’s a good read for first timers:
    https://cks.nice.org.uk/gout#!scenario:1

    Which cherries to choose for attempting gout remedy:
    http://blackcherryjuiceinfo.com/tart-cherry-vs-black-cherry/

  • #3307

    Keith Taylor
    Keymaster
    Ŧallars: Ŧ 870.25
    GoutPal Scholar Badge Rank: Scholar

    I think, if you’re posting links, it’s much better to give a short summary. Also say why it’s helpful. That’s particularly true for for the second link. Because I can’t access it, so I have no idea what it’s about.

    Also, unless links are closely related to a specific aspect of gout, it’s better to create separate topics for each resource.

    Other than that, it’s exactly why I created the Gout Resources forum.

  • #3319

    d q
    Participant
    Ŧallars: Ŧ 216.33
    GoutPal Scholar Badge Rank: Scholar

    Hi Keith, no worries mate. Will do in future.

    With regards to the second link, I am totally baffled as to why it asks for a username and password. It opened fine when searching from Google. Maybe Google had a cached copy. I just tried it again from the above link and it worked (probably locally cached now). It’s a great article but useless unless people can open it so I suggest maybe just delete that link.

    Cheers

  • #3320

    nobody
    Participant
    Ŧallars: Ŧ 243.36
    GoutPal Scholar Badge Rank: Scholar


    If you could confirm that is what your second link points to, at least people would know what it’s about: http://insights.ovid.com/international-clinical-rheumatology/intj/2014/08/000/rapid-crystal-dissolution-gout-feasible-advisable/6/01436946
    Without having read the article, I think the general idea is uncontroversial.

    As to the first link, I think that it provides a useful overview.
    For what it’s worth my rheuma dismissed it as outdated. While I agree some of the details are questionable, I suspect that was mainly a way to assert professional authority.

  • #3322

    d q
    Participant
    Ŧallars: Ŧ 216.33
    GoutPal Scholar Badge Rank: Scholar

    @nobody, yep based on the title, authors and date that is indeed the article. I can’t access the actual content on your link to compare though. Good article if you can get your hands on it. I don’t know how to post a working link as it opens fine here.

    That’s interesting, I’d like to see what my rheumatologist has to say. He generally thinks “he knows it all”.

  • #3628

    d q
    Participant
    Ŧallars: Ŧ 216.33
    GoutPal Scholar Badge Rank: Scholar

    This was in today’s Daily Mail online publication, probably not a very informative article but some of the responses on the comments page contain a little useful information (fructose syrup, sugar, etc.) ignoring the useless other comments though.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-4490314/Regularly-consuming-red-meat-chips-raise-risk.html

    The article discuses what causes gout and how it can be controlled a little better with a diet containing plenty of fruit and vegetables (nothing new to the experts but definitely worth a quick read for new gout sufferers and for the people that wish to learn a little more from the comments section of the article).

  • #4148

    d q
    Participant
    Ŧallars: Ŧ 216.33
    GoutPal Scholar Badge Rank: Scholar

    This link helps provides knowledge for starters and intermediates in understanding gout:

    https://cks.nice.org.uk/gout#!scenario:1

    It provides a good foundation for learning gout and treatment methods including what can be done to control pain from a good source. Drug dosing is based on UK guidelines but still points gout sufferers in the right direction. I think it’s a good read for first timers.

    This link provides the basic knowledge when picking which cherries to choose for attempting gout remedy:

    http://blackcherryjuiceinfo.com/tart-cherry-vs-black-cherry/

    @keith Maybe we should consolidate this thread into a single sticky thread with all the above links?

    • #4153

      Keith Taylor
      Keymaster
      Ŧallars: Ŧ 870.25
      GoutPal Scholar Badge Rank: Scholar

      Thanks, d_q, for your idea about a sticky thread. Because it’s certainly set me thinking about all sorts of management issues.

      Firstly, for readers who are not familiar with the idea of sticky threads. These are topics that everyone who is reading or contributing to a forum should read first. Also, there are super-sticky threads that appear first in every forum topic list. To clarify, ‘thread’ is just another word for ‘topic’. That is a conversation about a gout subject with one distinct topic. Or, one or more related topics.

      So, from that, my first problem with posting a sticky topic of unrelated links would be where to stick it!

      Personally, I think the best place would be for individuals to create their own sticky topic of interesting links in their personal gout area. Then, that prompts me to think of renaming the personal areas as “My Gout Learning Zone”. Or, some better title.

      Anyway, ignoring my rambling, and returning to the point made, who’s going to tell me where to stick it!? 😉 😀

  • #4151

    Rich Blazeski
    Participant
    Ŧallars: Ŧ 45.39
    GoutPal Researcher Badge Rank: Researcher

    Hi Guys,

    The more I read, the more I get confused. I ll quote below from one of the links provided above.

    Most people with hyperuricemia never develop clinical gout. In those who do, asymptomatic hyperuricemia often lasts up to 20 years before the initial attack.
    Onset in young adulthood is often related to an inherited defect in purine metabolism or renal urate transport.

    As I don t think I had hyperuricemia set on at 10 years..is 5.8 mg/dl considered hyperuricemia, as I have this value from a 2 years ago blood test, seems a bit high, but still..hyperuricemia..???
    I guess it should be something inherited, although in my family no one had gout.. and I asked everyone, uncles, cousins, parents.

    This thing gets me crazy. is there any way to find out the cause? I want to find out the cause, although might not matter..but for me it does..is just my way of being.is not related to that, but usually when something happens I want to know the reasons behind..
    I want to find out what enzyme, or stuff isn t working properly so that I ll speak with it:) I want to address directly to the source.. in my country we have a saying, I m going to laugh about something bad in an ironically way…don t know..to translate it properly.
    Anyway I kind of started to accept the idea that I have gout..that s it..but I would like at least to know the cause..is like someone try to kill you and you want to see his face :)) .

    • #4152

      Keith Taylor
      Keymaster
      Ŧallars: Ŧ 870.25
      GoutPal Scholar Badge Rank: Scholar

      No Rich, 5.8mg/dL is not hyperuricemia. In fact, none of your uric acid test results in the past 2 years from http://goutpal.net/forums/topic/gout-or-not-2/#post-4080 are hyperuricemia. Because despite there being no official definition of hyperuricemia, it is generally described as uric acid at least 7mg/dL.

      So, with those test results, if you have gout, you must have:
      1. A history of exposure to low temperatures.
      Or, 2. Some other factor that I’ve never heard of that causes uric acid to form crystals at such a low concentration.

      Having said that, I remember a long conversation about impossible gout in my previous forum. After lots of “what-ifs” it turns out the guy was reading his blood test results wrong! Please note, Rich, I’m not saying that is the case for you. But I’m at a loss to suggest anything other than a structured help plan. That way, I can get to know you better, and hopefully give you a logical way to understand exactly what is happening to you.

    • #4154

      Keith Taylor
      Keymaster
      Ŧallars: Ŧ 870.25
      GoutPal Scholar Badge Rank: Scholar

      Coincidentally, I just read another definition of hyperuricemia:

      Gout, a result of hyperuricaemia above 390 μmol/l (6.5 mg/dl)

      Apologies for the pointless extra ‘a’ in the middle of hyperuricemia. But, that lower figure makes more sense to me than anything above 6.8mg/dL.

You should log in to GoutPal to reply to this topic.


If you do not want to log in, you can post a reply via the orange Gout Help button, or raise a new GoutPal helpdesk ticket.