I crave your culture

Stopping Gout Together Forums General Discussion I crave your culture

This topic contains 7 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Keith Taylor 1 year, 9 months ago.

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  • #1386

    Keith Taylor
    Keymaster
    Ŧallars: Ŧ 1004.66
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    OK, that was an attention-grabbing headline that, like the best headlines, isn’t completely true.

    What I really mean is I’d like more everyday Stateside sayings and cultural references.

    I was thinking how we sweat the small stuff. In the UK, most people are obsessed with personal wealth, and they absolutely love borrowing as much as possible. For the extremists, we have a culture of payday loans. They are all pretty much the same. People obsess over the difference between borrowing at 3200% or 3500%. The real problem is they are living beyond their means. I’ve no idea if this is commonplace or not.

    Anyway, the gout forum is supposed to be as scientific as it can be. That doesn’t apply to this forum watering hole.

    Let’s share culture stories instead of gout stories.

    Only you can make my analogies meaningful. Bonus points if you can guess what I might use the debt burden analogy for. 🙂

  • #1750

    Carolyn Poulter
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    GoutPal Carer Badge Rank: Carer

    Interesting off-topic topic!

    I was born in the UK, grew up ‘overseas’ in Europe and the Caribbean, incarcerated in a convent boarding school in Sunninghill Berkshire which kind of explains everything now that i think about it! Got married very young, promptly split up and then settled down with Alan, got married for the second – hopefully last! – time at the ripe old age of 21. Yup 41 years ago next week.

    When we were first together we lived in Essex, then Shropshire/Welsh border, then the US and finally, Canada. So I’ve experienced a whole variety of cultures.

    Yes I had noticed the money centric thing in the UK, it seems more so than when I was young but who knows maybe it was back then too. In the US the thing that has always struck me as odd is the peculiar class thing they have going on. I know, massive generalization about such a huge population but I have been to many many States in the US and in every one, the moment people hear my accent I can guarantee you someone in the group will immediately say how much ‘They love the Royal Family. That there is a castle over there in their background, and of course they were Dukes or Earls or whatever. Also that their forebears came over on the Mayflower.’ Except in March when they all claim to be Irish.

    Because I am a lady and try not to be rude I have never replied with the following even though I think it every time.

    ‘If your ancestors were titled and have a castle why did they risk life and limb on a boat to head to the New World, trek across the country in perilous conditions in covered wagons? As for the Mayflower, ah you must be related to – insert any name you like here because it doesn’t matter – their ancestors were on the Mayflower too, it must have been a flipping great big ship doing multiple crossings a month to get all the people I’ve met here with that claim’s families across.’ But I don’t, I just smile and mutter ‘How fascinating’ or other rubbish. In the US they do not seem to consider it rude to ask ow much money a person makes. Make derogatory comments about British food even though they have never been there. One chap told me he hated the UK because we ‘don’t have central heating and the food was poor’. I replied, we do have central heating, had it for quite a while, I am pretty sure the Romans introduced it in fact, along with roads, currency, etc. and except for the odd bit of enslavement they did quite a bit for the UK. When were you last in the UK that you didn’t have central heating?’

    His reply?

    ‘1942, I was in a barracks in a US base.’

    I kid you not!

    Canada is similar but oh so different. There are more photos of Liz and Phil the Greek on local council walls than in the whole of the UK I think. Canada is the second largest country in the world after Russia but there are less than 40 million of us, mostly living within shouting distance of the US border – an exaggeration but close – and our humour is closer to the UK than US. In fact a lot of it is based on that, we are a mouse sleeping next to an elephant after all. And we are actually secretly invading the US, they just don’t know it yet.
    Not sure if links are allowed so I’ll add this and see what happens….. this is just a few, it doesn’t include Michael J Fox, Keanu Reeves, loads of pop and rock stars, oh.. father and sn…actors…. Sutherland, Donald and thingie his son, Christopher Plummer…. well there’s a lot.
    Secret Canadians

    About me, I live in a geodesic dome home and contrary to popular belief we don’t live in igloos but I do love showing Americans the photo of our house in winter just to convince them that we do!

    Dome Homes, click on Canadians live in igloos doncha know

    Ask me anything you like!

    • #1826

      Keith Taylor
      Keymaster
      Ŧallars: Ŧ 1004.66
      GoutPal Scholar Badge Rank: Scholar

      I hope your 41st anniversary went well. I’ve just seen the photo on your website.
      Alan and Carolyn 41 years ago

      Cute.

  • #1830

    Patrick
    Participant
    Ŧallars: Ŧ 108.06
    GoutPal Scholar Badge Rank: Scholar


    As I’ve mentioned before, my “culture” is strictly West Coast. Born and bred in Southern California my whole life. I live very close to the beach in southern california and what’s not to love? We have sunshine 330 days a year, even though we could use a little rain since we’re mired in a 6 year drought that is killing our forests and lakes.

    I am a firefighter in Los Angeles and have been for 26 years. I work in the downtown area of Los Angeles so it’s always a busy day for me when I’m working. When I do find time to relax, it’s one of busy activity. I play golf at least 5 times a month, I snowboard in winter and surf in summer. I love the outdoors, so mountain biking and hiking are part of my regiment, as is playing softball in our Friday league (when work allows). I’m a married man of 25 years with a beautiful wife and 2 great kids. My son is 24 and he is also a firefighter in Los Angeles. As a matter of fact, he works at the Firehouse down the street from me on the very same shift as me, so we actually are on a lot of the same fires and incidents together. It drives my wife nuts. My daughter is 22 and is a web designer with a marketing degree. Both live on their own.

    Funny how this Gout condition drove me to this site. As you can imagine, being a firefighter who has Gout, can really be a huge problem, especially if that “flare Up” occurs while I’m at work. We are on 24 hour shifts here, meaning we eat and sleep at the firehouse. I was desperate for info and the “powers that be” brought me here. I’m truly blessed for that because I’ve learned so much. OOPS, got a little off topic there.

    In southern California, the culture here can be described in the following:

    Wealth and/or status–impress people
    Survival–trying to keep your head above water since it’s expensive to live here
    Layed back– enjoy what you have around you.

    Everyday, I see the best and the WORST of people in my line of work. It makes me appreciate the things I have and the life I lead. I lead by example and hope others follow, especially my family. That’s about it. I enjoy the site and meeting new people here and hearing about their struggles. If I can help, I try. If I can’t, i learn from those you can.

    • #1946

      Keith Taylor
      Keymaster
      Ŧallars: Ŧ 1004.66
      GoutPal Scholar Badge Rank: Scholar

      Wow Patrick! That’s a fantastic snapshot of your life.

      I always saw you as one of life’s givers. You’ve always been quick to respond to messages from people who need a little help. Including myself.

      Now, I realize you spend your life helping others. Your story reminds me of the old saying: Life has its own rewards.

      This shows how we might have cultural differences on the surface. Different phrases. Different passtimes. Etc. But struggling to better your family living conditions is a global concern. Enjoying what’s around you is a common cultural goal. I think we should all spend more time doing that.

  • #1974

    Patrick
    Participant
    Ŧallars: Ŧ 108.06
    GoutPal Scholar Badge Rank: Scholar

    I’ll tell you something Keith. I’ve dedicated almost 30 years of my life helping complete strangers. It’s a career path I’ve always wanted since I was a little kid. But the ironic thing is I couldn’t find anyone to help ME with this condition I have called Gout. I had to rely on you and a group of like minded complete strangers to help me with information and a plan.

    I live by the words “treat others as you would want to be treated yourself.” I try to help answer posters questions without seeming like a “know it all” because I certainly don’t. I have done a ton of research on this condition, and have listened to many others who are in the same boat.

    Thanks for the kind words.

  • #1978

    Carolyn Poulter
    Participant
    Ŧallars: Ŧ -3.82
    GoutPal Carer Badge Rank: Carer

    Finally a new month of data usage! Downside of living in the sticks is limited and expensive net access. Thanks for the anniversary wishes. We had a lovely time in Kingston and on the 1000 Island cruise. OK time to get back to reading and catching up!

    • #1985

      Keith Taylor
      Keymaster
      Ŧallars: Ŧ 1004.66
      GoutPal Scholar Badge Rank: Scholar

      “limited and expensive net access. ”

      Aaaargh! That’s one aspect of any culture that I’d find very difficult to live with. 😥

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