NEW GUY

This topic contains 8 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  d q 1 year, 4 months ago.

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  • #3651

    Marc Fehr
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    Ŧallars: Ŧ 3.57
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    I just logged in and it brought me here. I guess my topic is super general right now.
    I am 41 and been dealing with gout since I was 36. and actually even earlier but at that time I had no idea what it was and only came once a year kind of thing.

    Are there any fast, good tips I can get right now? I try to use apple cider vinegar once in a while. I notice no real change or benefit but it has a slight placebo affect. I’ve only been prescribed Indomethecin and Colchicine before, haven’t tried anything else. I think I need better doctors, or better educate myself and pursuade the doctors myself like you did.
    I recently had the surgery on my left foot so now the joints at least work again. It’s been 3 weeks and still painful. Worried the gout will now attack my right foot. I think I feel the beginnings of one.

    That’s it for now, thanks. Marc

  • #3653

    nobody
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    GoutPal Scholar Badge Rank: Scholar

    Hi,

    Gout is something which ought to be managed with a longer time horizon but until you get serious about that…

    Colchicine and indomethacin do not address the cause of gout but are effective to manage the symptoms if taken in sufficently large doses.
    Watch for side effects getting worse over time. Should that happen to you, you’ll be better off in the long run if you don’t ignore it.

    Outside of drugs, hydratation and blood flow matter. Also, best avoid cold. You ought to drink lots of water (within reason) and relax as much as possible. Support your foot to relieve your muscles if needed but make sure to keep moving your foot regularly. If at all possible, occasionally get your heart pumping with whatever exercise doesn’t hurt your foot or perhaps with hot showers. Some people bathe their foot in hot water which addresses several of the aforementioned concerns.

    Last but not least, people who have untreated gout, aren’t monitoring their liver and kidneys and take drugs such as indomethacin should be very careful with alcohol.

  • #3666

    Keith Taylor
    Keymaster
    Ŧallars: Ŧ 1123.04
    GoutPal Scholar Badge Rank: Scholar

    Hi Marc,

    All I can add to nobody’s comments is to suggest you get a uric acid blood test as soon as possible. Because, every day, your gout is going to get worse, until you get uric acid safe. Of course, we have to consider gout pain relief until you get uric acid under control. But, your uric acid numbers are everything now.

    So, if you have had blood tests, can you get the history from your doctor? Then post the numbers here. We need dates (can be approximate), and exact uric acid level with unit of measure. But, if you haven’t had uric acid blood tests, can you arrange one soon?

    Then, we can work out if you prefer drugs, herbal gout medicine, or lifestyle improvements. So that we can finally end your gout problems.


  • #3671

    Marc Fehr
    Participant
    Ŧallars: Ŧ 3.57
    GoutPal Carer Badge Rank: Carer


    Thanks guys.
    No doctor to date has tested my uric acid nor blood nor joint fluid.
    They say Canadian healthcare is free, but it comes at a price. I will have to educate myself and nag these doctors and keep looking for the right one to get me started and help me along. I have an appointment with my podiatrist tomorrow to evaluate the healing from surgery.
    Thank you so much for this website I now have renewed hope. I will get those tests done asap and I’ve written down all the drug treatments you have listed, a few of which I’ve never even heard of.
    A major problem is that my work is often quite physical and if I go back to the same job I was doing, that means steel toe boots all day everyday. Should I just give up on that and try harder to find jobs that don’t involve my feet so much? Or keep hope alive and beat this thing and do whatever I want with my feet like I used to?

    • #3683

      nobody
      Participant
      Ŧallars: Ŧ 467.45
      GoutPal Scholar Badge Rank: Scholar

      It seems premature to give up on your job but I have no idea how easy it would be for you to find something else, how much of a setback you might expect by losing whatever seniority you’ve got and so forth.
      Beating this thing might take time and might possibly involve being less physically active for a while but it’s way too early to tell. It doesn’t sound like your gout problem is as of yet very bad so let’s not assume you’ll be one of the ones who has a hard time beating it.
      If you had test results and an experienced doctor, you might have a clearer picture of the road ahead. The appropriate medical specialist for gout is called a rheumatologist but having a piece of paper with a job title is of course not the same thing as having skill or experience…

  • #3684

    Marc Fehr
    Participant
    Ŧallars: Ŧ 3.57
    GoutPal Carer Badge Rank: Carer

    Okay I got a new family doctor today and got the blood work done today as well. I will post Thursday when I get results of my uric acid. I’m getting her to get me started on Allopurinol on Thursday (hopefully).

    I’ll be browsing around on this site a lot. I heard spinach is not the best due to purines? but I just had a whey protein shake with a handful of spinach and milk. Am about to eat broccolli and then some chicken breast.

    I am serious about a long term plan to control my gout and getting my life back.

    • #3685

      nobody
      Participant
      Ŧallars: Ŧ 467.45
      GoutPal Scholar Badge Rank: Scholar

      Spinach is OK. Sure, it’s not ideal from the purine perspective but on the other hand it’s the kind of food that helps your kidneys deal with uric acid. And if you take an adequate dose of allopurinol or similar, purines aren’t going to matter much while the helpful effect of spinach will remain relevant.
      People who drink milk seem to have an easier time with gout than those who don’t.

      Until you know what’s going on in your body and are taking effective medication, I think you ought to be careful with stuff like protein supplements.
      If your supplement is plain whey without dodgy ingredients, it should be OK in moderation but excessive protein intake isn’t great for untreated gout or your kidneys.

      Good luck finding a long term solution!

  • #3698

    Keith Taylor
    Keymaster
    Ŧallars: Ŧ 1123.04
    GoutPal Scholar Badge Rank: Scholar

    Hi Marc,

    Before I address the individual points you’ve raised, I’d like to clarify how I offer my gout help services. Either, you can continue with one-off questions, as they arise (I call this Casual Gout Help). Or, you can start a gout diary. Then, follow that up with step-by-step plans to manage different aspects of gout (I call this Structured Gout Help).

    “steel toe boots all day everyday”. Boots are great for supporting gouty feet. But, the issue is standing all day, which would be much more painful with less supportive footwear. So, I suggest we fix your gout. Then, you can make job choices based on what you prefer to do.

    As for diet, you have to step back, and look at the big picture. Because gout diet is about managing weekly meals in total, not individual foods. Spinach, broccoli and milk are great parts of a good gout foundation diet (please checkout that survey). Also, chicken and moderate amounts of other meat and fish have a healthy contribution to make. And, supplements can have their place in a healthy diet. In which case, there are strong pluses, and some minuses, with whey protein for gout. But, if all you eat is spinach, broccoli, milk, and chicken, you do not have a healthy diet. So, for the best gout diet, you should only think of individual foods when you are looking to tweak your diet to meet your goals. For instance, you might ask if you can get nearer your uric acid target by reviewing your chicken consumption. Then, in the context of your weekly meal plans (or shopping cart), you could consider changing some of your chicken for something else.

  • #3756

    d q
    Participant
    Ŧallars: Ŧ 335.61
    GoutPal Scholar Badge Rank: Scholar

    Just a few points to add;

    1. Spinach is a vegetable purine and doesn’t really count much so don’t worry too much.

    2. Lean chicken (breast) I believe is less purine rich then other meat food. Keith has a list on he’s site if you search.

    3. As stated by nobody, once on allopurinol and things improve you can plan for a healthy diet more then just a low purine healthy diet.

    4. Get tested for kidney and liver function on all changes to your allopurinol regime.

    Good luck 🙂

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