Gout and Uric Acid Treatment Question

Stopping Gout Together Forums Help My Gout! The Gout Forum Gout and Uric Acid Treatment Question

This topic contains 4 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Keith Taylor 1 year, 2 months ago.

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  • #4651

    Eric Bolvin
    Participant
    Ŧallars: Ŧ 18.38
    GoutPal Historian Badge Rank: Historian


    Hi; Just had my first attack in 13 years. Previously I had been treated with allopurinol and colchicine. Also Indocin for the acute attacks. Sorry if I can’t spell those.

    So my new Doc gave me all three of those and 2 days later I am better. I intend to continue taking allopurinol. The problem is my insurance doesn’t cover colchicine yet so I don’t have any.

    Wondering how I will do without it? Do I need it if have the other two drugs?

    Also how much alcohol or coffee is it safe to drink?

    Thanks you.

  • #4652

    nobody
    Participant
    Ŧallars: Ŧ 470.84
    GoutPal Scholar Badge Rank: Scholar

    You should be OK without colchicine if you can tolerate loads of indometacin. Colchicine is much better at preventing or ending attacks over the course a few days than at providing quick relief. The main downsides of indometacin (and of numerous similar drugs) are side effects and very long attacks. But some people apparently don’t get these very long attacks in the first place or are able to take so much indometacin (or similar) as to ride them out easily.
    Colchicine isn’t covered by regular health insurance here either but it doesn’t matter since it’s an ancient medicine and profiteers don’t quite have the run of the place. Colchicine is therefore dirt cheap. Perhaps it is also dirt cheap where you live. If not, possibly you could get someone abroad to put some in the mail for you or something.

    As you probably are well aware, allopurinol is something you should continue taking whether you are in pain or not. People tend to take it for the rest of their lives and blood tests are used to determine the appropriate dose and to catch insidious harmful effects early.
    I would also recommend a blood test if you’ve not taken indometacin (or similar) for many years and find you need to take it for more than a few days. Best catch any insidious damage early. In that case, best watch out for any unusual abdominal pain and report that to a doctor as well.

    The safe amount of alcohol is zero. Once you have taken a sufficent amount of allopurinol daily for a while and a blood test has also confirmed that your body is handling the drugs you’re taking just fine, moderate amounts of alcohol will be much safer.
    Coffee is fine unless you have health concerns you didn’t mention.

  • #4653

    Eric Bolvin
    Participant
    Ŧallars: Ŧ 18.38
    GoutPal Historian Badge Rank: Historian

    Thank you. I don’t take much Indocin, only when the acute attack hits, so it doesn’t bother me.
    Where do you live? I am in CA under Obamacare and the cost for 60 Colchicine is over $300. Rip-off.
    Funny thing is I thought I had injured my toe and it didn’t feel like gout, Then I had a big cup of coffee and some diet coke so a pretty big dose of caffeine. The next thing I knew I was in a gout attack. So I don’t know if it was a trigger as I am not a regular coffee drinker. I read that if you are not daily coffee drinker than it can precipitate an attack.

    Thanks for the help.

    Eb

    • #4722

      Keith Taylor
      Keymaster
      Ŧallars: Ŧ 1138.53
      GoutPal Scholar Badge Rank: Scholar


      Hi Eric,

      You should be able to get cheaper alternatives now if you shop around. Because the exclusive license deal on Colcrys has finished. But, if you can cope ok without it, then just use Indocin as you need it.

      The real issue here is why you are still getting flares if you’ve been on allopurinol for several years. If the dose is right, then flares should stop completely after around six months. So, do you have any uric acid test results?

      Also, you need to know your uric acid level to have any chance of interpreting gout triggers. So, rather than dwell on triggers, I recommend making sure your allopurinol dose is sufficient to stop any flares in future.


  • #4654

    nobody
    Participant
    Ŧallars: Ŧ 470.84
    GoutPal Scholar Badge Rank: Scholar

    Triggers are somewhat personal. If you find that coffee triggers you, best avoid that.
    But I think it’s more likely that a small injury triggered the attack. That or it wasn’t an injury at all but the beginning of the attack… in that case, the trigger obviously can’t have been what you ate or drink afterwards.
    If your attack was triggered by a type of injury which you very rarely or never experience, there’s an outside chance you don’t actually need allopurinol. Again, blood tests would tell.

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