Attack one year into AP treatment

Stopping Gout Together Forums Help My Gout! The Gout Forum Attack one year into AP treatment

  • This topic has 6 replies, 3 voices, and was last updated 1 week ago by Nick.
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    • #10465
      Nick
      Participant


      Hi all,

      My first post here. I finally agreed to start taking AP about one year ago and it’s been great – no attacks.

      This weekend I’ve had what I am pretty sure is a gout attack in my right ankle knuckle, although that’s self-diagnosed of course.

      I wanted to ask what people’s experiences have been of having attacks even after the period of AP taking hold – which I understand to be well under a year.

      Thanks,

      Nick.

    • #10466
      nobody
      Participant

      In order for AP to cure gout, the dosage must be right. Else it’s going to help but will not stop attacks completely.
      And how long it takes depends largely on how bad your gout was: how long it was untreated, the average amount of uric acid in your blood before treatment, and how efficiently your body excretes uric acid (which implies it might also depend a bit on other factors such as your consumption of other drugs).
      It is not unusual to experience an attack a year after starting AP but since you have provided none of the above information, I can not say whether something seems wrong with your treatment or not.

      There is as I’m sure you’re aware a possibility that your ankle problem has nothing to do with gout so perhaps you should see a doctor (depending on how bad it is, how long it lasts and so forth and so forth).

      • #10467
        Nick
        Participant

        Thanks for your reply,
        nobody.

        Don’t worry I’m not after medical advice, I’d only take that from my
        GP and not an Internet forum 🙂.

        I was interested to hear the experiences of others who have been on AP for a prolonged period – how long did it take to find the right dosage, do you still suffer attacks etc ?

        Cheers.

      • #10468
        nobody
        Participant

        I don’t understand what you’re after if not advice about a medical issue but the time to find the right dosage as well as the time during which people still suffer from attacks varies wildly. The experience of a couple of random people will therefore not be of much help unless these people have a decent theoretical understanding of the issue are only refering to their own experience in order to illustrate a point.
        Again, there’s no way I can give you a more useful answer as long as you do not provide any of the relevant information. But you could of course provide your own answer by reading the relevant literature yourself.

      • #10469
        Nick
        Participant

        No worries if you can’t help. Will see what others have to say about their experiences.

    • #10470
      Keith Taylor
      Participant

      The significant things missing from this thread are allopurinol dose and uric acid blood test results.

      This is a bit like watching a game with all players in the same strip and no one keeping score.

      Nick, as far as my experience goes…

      In 2011, I achieved my target uric acid level after 3 dose adjustments and 2 arguments about the meaning of normal uric acid. The only glimmer of enlightenment was preventative colchicine prescribed alongside allopurinol. So no attacks.

      Logic suggests to me that, without a DECT scan to assess diminishing uric acid crystal load, allopurinol patients should be prepared to deal with attacks from dissolving crystals for as many years as they had untreated excess uric acid. [Discuss]

      • #10471
        Nick
        Participant

        Thanks Keith.

        I have been on 300mg of AP for approximately 1 year, and my last UA reading was 287 in June last year. The (self-diagnosed) attack over the past three days (now almost over) was the first since AP.

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