Any Dairy Intolerant Gout Foods

Any Gout Food for Dairy-intolerant person?

Stopping Gout Together Forums Help My Gout! The Gout Forum Any Gout Food for Dairy-intolerant person?

This topic contains 4 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  nobody 3 months ago.

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  • #7187

    June Collins
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    Hello all. I have just had my first confirmed case of gout (Yay!) I’ve been doing as much reading as I can but I must say, the info out there is conflicting and therefore dubious. Dairy is mentioned as my best bet for including protein in my (new) diet but I’m dairy intolerant. What do you people recommend as an efficient substitute (don’t say tofu) for dairy? I love practically all nuts and peanuts too but those are so high in calories and fat, I’m hoping for a lower impact on those values. I watched a video by a rheumatologist who said changing your lifestyle will have little impact on your Uric acid levels which I don’t understand since (likely) lifestyle is a contributing factor. Any advice is truly appreciated.


    Any Dairy Intolerant Gout Foods

    Are there any Dairy Intolerant Gout Foods?

  • #7188

    Keith Taylor
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    It would be easier for me to respond if you gave reference to the information you are asking about. But I’ll try to explain the rheumatologist video. I assume it is a general gout video rather than one targeting obese or other malnourished people.

    Except for secondary gout, most uric acid imbalance is genetic. So lifestyle might be a contributary factor but it is not the starting point for treatment. Therefore diet can contribute to your gout management plan. But it should not be the foundation of your plans.

    Why can’t I say tofu? Not that I was going to.

  • #7195

    nobody
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    Can we say eggs?
    The protein issue is more complicated than most people have patience for but, while one-word answers can be misleading or even dangerous, not saying anything to someone on a dangerous path is its own kind of irresponsible.
    What am I talking about? Well, combining calorie counting with the notion that animal protein can be replaced with nuts is a good way to end up with protein deficiency. Soy products are a decent way to replace animal protein (hence their popularity). Like eggs, soy products also happen to be uric acid friendly. Nuts on the other hand need to be combined with other foods such as lentils in order get enough of all protein types. There are alternatives to legumes containing a lot less calories but they may raise uric acid if you consume very large amounts (which would be required to make them a major protein source).

    Whether gout is genetic or not is irrelevant. If the hyperuricemia is mild, you might be able to treat it with dietary modification.
    So the starting point is to measure uric acid.

  • #7198

    June Collins
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    GoutPal Detective Badge Rank: Detective


    Thank you for your responses. I had a Uric acid level of 7.6. Incidentally, I had started a collagen supplement three days prior to my first gout attack and wondered if anyone else has had a similar experience.

    The last few times I’ve had soy milk I had severe itching all over. I assume I should avoid tofu. Also, being a menopausal woman, I recently started HRT and there are some questions about soy interfering with HRT.

    I had seen eggs mentioned on several sites but as has been the case so many times, one website said yes to eggs, another said no and still another said egg whites but no yolk.

    Obviously this is all new to me I appreciate your patience and understanding.

  • #7200

    nobody
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    I have no idea what collagen does or doesn’t do. I guess it’s worth looking up whether there might be a connection.
    You might also want to post the full composition of the supplement here in case someone might recognize a troublesome chemical.

    There are plenty of reasons to eat eggs and plenty of reasons to abstain. I don’t know what health issues you are dealing with but I can tell you that, unlike animal flesh, eggs do not increase uric acid while providing a type of protein that people usually get from meat, fish, dairy or soy. You can read any amount of nonsense on the Internet which is why you shouldn’t waste your time with random websites. If you’re willing to read boring stuff, I can provide a citation or two to document my claims (just tell me exactly what you are unsure about).
    I guess eggs may interfere with HRT as well but that’s a problem with so many foods provifing that type of protein that trying to get rid of all foods which contain or affect hormones is a ticket for protein deficiency if one’s not extremely careful.
    Now one’s diet should be evaluated as a whole. It would of course not be wise to eat nothing but eggs! How many daily eggs you’d need for protein depends on your size and on what else you’re eating.

    More imporantly, 7.6 is high enough that I’d recommend asking for a drug which lowers uric acid.
    The number isn’t so high that there’s zero chance of fixing the problem without such a drug but it doesn’t look good and I’d need details (in particular: your size, everything you usually eat and drink, any drugs you’re taking) in order to venture a guess as to your actual chances. Really, you shouldn’t bother with the details and simply take a pill. It works so much faster than lifestyle modifications. You’d still be able to experiment with diet and lifestyle later on to get rid of the pill. But doing such experiments after curing your gout would spare you much misery in the long run.
    One thing you could perhaps do before deciding on a pill is to get a second test (the number sometimes varies). That would also be a good opportunity to get a baseline for liver and kidney function if you don’t have one already.

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