Helicobacter Pylori Causes Gout

H. Pylori and Gout – Cause & Effects

Stopping Gout Together Forums Help My Gout! The Gout Forum H. Pylori and Gout – Cause & Effects

This topic contains 5 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  d q 1 year, 2 months ago.

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  • #5579

    Rich Blazeski
    Participant
    Ŧallars: Ŧ 50.01


    hey,

    how are you guys, I found today by mistake the below post, here is just a part of it, was actually a study.
    what do you think? has anybody heard about any relations between this bacteria and gout, or the study is just meaningless.?

    H. pylori could migrate or get forced to migrate to the colon leading to colonic re-absorptive error with excess accumulation of fluids and salts in the body; uric acid could be among these reabsorbed elements giving a picture of elevated serum uric acid level that would have no relation to age of the individual or the integrity of his renal function. Furthermore, gout has been recently considered as one of the auto-inflammatory diseases, hence cytokines are the most common mediators of inflammation; therefore, the role played by the increased mucosal production of inflammatory mediators (cytokines) induced by H. pylori is supposed to contribute in the pathogenesis of gout. In this situation, hyperuricemia is not expected to be adequately or successfully improved by traditional urate lowering measures regardless of the age of patient or the state of his kidney function.


    Helicobacter Pylori Causes Gout

    Helicobacter Pylori Causes Gout

  • #5581

    nobody
    Participant
    Ŧallars: Ŧ 502.41

    If the study was published in a decent journal, it almost certainly isn’t meaningless.
    But note “hyperuricemia is not expected to be adequately or successfully improved by traditional urate lowering measures”. So it seems it would be relevant to people who keep getting abnormally high blood tests after taking drugs such as allopurinol. There should also be other signs pointing to “excess accumulation of fluids and salts”.
    If I recall correctly, your tests were never really high in the first place.

  • #5582

    Rich Blazeski
    Participant
    Ŧallars: Ŧ 50.01

    well, mine no, I was just thinking as I followed a treatment for this bacteria, and found this article by mistake, it s been conducted by some doctor in saudi arabia I think, thats why I asked, on internet I didn t find much about that, regarding my results after starting to eat meat again my u.a went from 4.3 mg to 5.4 mg, latest result one month ago..no more allopurinol also.

  • #5583

    urankjj .
    Participant
    Ŧallars: Ŧ 27.94


    Hi Rich, You might want to read this as it could be helpful to you, as it was for myself and my gout problems. It does get a bit technical, but It may have some insights to some of your earlier questions.

    [admin: link updated to more recent report]
    Lu, Li-juan, Ning-Bo Hao, Jian-Jun Liu, Xue Li, and Rui-Ling Wang. “Correlation between Helicobacter pylori Infection and Metabolic Abnormality in General Population: A Cross-Sectional Study.” Gastroenterology research and practice 2018 (2018).

    In this study, we revealed that H. pylori infection was in association with uric acid

    Also:
    Ndebi, M. E. “The assessment of risk factors, lipid profile, uric acid and alanine aminotransferase in Helicobacter pylori-positive subjects.” International Journal 6, no. 9 (2018): 2889.

    Our study therefore suggests that H. pylori infection can cause modifications of lipid parameters and uremia that are considered as risk factors for cardiovascular diseases and gout. […] our data showed that H. pylori infection significantly modified serum uric acid level. Previous studies demonstrated that chronic H. pylori infection involves significant increase in uric acid serum level

  • #5584

    urankjj .
    Participant
    Ŧallars: Ŧ 27.94

    Rich, Also worth a read and a ‘hill of beans’, good luck…
    Urate Oxidase (Uricase)

  • #5595

    d q
    Participant
    Ŧallars: Ŧ 363.33

    @urankjj – the link on Urate Oxidase is exceptional. More specifically the statement

    It has been proposed that the loss of urate oxidase gene expression has been advantageous to hominids, since uric acid is a powerful antioxidant and scavenger of singlet oxygen and radicals.[5]

    This _may seem_ to explain the potential for haemoglobin reductions seen when starting uric acid lowering therapy, more specifically in patients with blood disorders resulting in secondary gout [Uric Acid Arthritis].

    You’ve just inspired me to further continue my investigations on how anti-oxidants impact cell turnover.

    Thank you.

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