Oranges and Gout

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    • #10261
      akkers5
      Participant


      Is there any truth in claims that citrus fruits (oranges, tangerines, clementines, mangoes etc) can cause or trigger gout?
      Theory goes that these contain fructose which, when metabolised, produce uric acid.

    • #10262
      nobody
      Participant

      Some citrus fruits do not have much fructose. It depends on the amount you consume, what else you eat and your metabolism but lemons, clementines and the like would probably be more likely to your SUA. Mangoes are more likely to be a problem (depending on the amount). But in most cases, the impact will be minimal anyway. What you’d be eating or drinking instead probably matters more.
      If you’re concerned about fructose, you should be looking at actual numbers and quit generalizing. And I’d be much more concerned about how fructose impacts your uric acid indirectly (through both caloric intake and liver function) rather than whatever it might turn into since fructose doesn’t contain any nitrogen.

      Anything can trigger gout, especially if you go crazy with it.
      Citrus fruits would however be very low indeed in the list of likely culprits… and if they happen to trigger you for some reason, that’s a sign you need better UA control which you will never achieve by changing the amount of citrus fruits you consume one way or the other.

    • #10263
      akkers5
      Participant

      I heard that juices and fizzy drinks contain higgh level of fructose (sweetners). So drinking fruit juices could be false hope.

    • #10264
      nobody
      Participant

      There are of course unsweetened drinks you can buy. Or you could simply make them yourself.
      Hope is poitnless and “high level” is meaningless. Every product (or cultivar) is different. Either you have a number or you don’t. If you don’t, best abstain.

      In any case… at home (or wherever you wouldn’t be bothering anyone doing so) you should be eating whole fruits and drinking water, plain or flavored with herbs and/or lemon rather than sweetened. Fizzying that up is of course harmless.
      But if you want glucose on the move, the right fruit juice is a decent option as long as you understand it’s not a replacement for a meal or some kind of comfort drink but a fuel that should be consumed in amounts proportionate to the energy you’re expending.

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